Re-Route Magazine

Tribe of Mannequins

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Photography
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6 min read
Black and white photo of an attractive white woman. She is indoors and wearing a white blouse. Her hair is short, she has dark eyes. Her ears are pierced multiple times. Text reads: Kirsty Cullen Campanelli, Autist | ADHD
Top left photo is a black and white photo of an attractive white woman. She is indoors wearing a white blouse and neutral color slacks. Bottom left photo is a black and white photo of an RV driving in the desert. The RV is ahead of us. Right middle photo is a color photo of a metal triangle instrument. Text reads Tribe of Mannequins, Kirsty's creative name. Next paragraph reads Kirsty is passionate about mental health awareness. Having lived with with PTSD and depression, she describes her photography as capturing moments grounded in emotion, through her own internal lens.
Black and white photo of a baggage carousel at an airport.
Black and white photo of Kirsty's reflection in a hotel window as she takes a photo of the Las Vegas Strip. The Wyndham hotel is close. Text reads THE WAVE, a short essay. Text reads: I’ve always thought about mental health as a wave.  A wave that ebbs and flows - it brings a sweeping sadness over us and then simmers down to a flat emptiness that can only be described as a disassociated shallow water.  And then. When we least expect it (because it’s always when we least expect it, right?) - a wildly overwhelming and what feels like an impossible storm hits us, and we’re drowning.  Drowning in the never ending rain beating down on us, and suddenly we’re being pulled down by a current that feels like it has a million hands.
On the left is a black and white photo of water on the bay. There are two dock poles with a rope between them. The continued essay is here. It starts with a header UNITY. Body text reads: This, to me, is grief. But it’s also my clarity of mind, my mental health, my depression, and my anxiety.  I’ve now come to realize it’s also related to my neurodivergence - being autistic with ADHD.  Does having a name for my storm help me weather it like a skilled sailor?  Sometimes. Sometimes it feels like it does. That’s my spiked cognitive profile.  Sometimes being covered in barnacles can seem like it hardens you to the harshness of the storm, but they only break off and press into your sore salt-covered skin. However, having a community of neighbouring boats out there on the vast ocean with me does bring with it a validation that I never thought possible.  And I’m grateful for that.   Be a lighthouse in a tempest when you can, be a neighbouring boat. Be yourself in an inflatable dingy. You never know how much it can help someone else.   …But don’t forget to save yourself too.  -Kirsty Cullen-Campanelli
A photo of Kirsty similar to the first one, however in this photo, her eyes look to the side. Header text reads, SELF-LOVE, body text reads: Nurturing a healthy mental state can be challenging for those who are neurovariant, but accepting one's uniqueness can provide a soothing balm that fosters resilience when facing life's diverse challenges. This intrinsic beauty grants solace, promoting growth and self-acceptance in a world that thrives on diversity.
Black and white photo of a long hallway with very high rounded cathedral like ceilings. There are lamps hanging from the ceiling on chains.

Follow Kristy's Instagram accounts for more.

Personal Account: @jetson_zero
Photography Account: @tribeofmannequins

Tag icon
Photography
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Timer icon
6 min read
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August 16, 2023
Re-Route Magazine

Committed to publishing the work of emerging and accomplished writers.